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NEWS: in Talisman #44 — Basil King and more

In TALISMAN #44 – 2016         www.talismanmag.net    online only   FREE
Special Section on Neeli Cherkovski
New Work by Cherkovski
Commentary by Seth Amos, Michael Berger,Patrick James Dunagan,
Peter Valente, and A.D. Winans, 
*Special section: ​Basil King, “Crownstone”

*Special section: George Quasha, “fluctuant gender (preverbs)”

Talisman masthead
Talisman masthead
Cover photo for Talisman #44
Cover photo for Talisman #44

Wonderful works by King and Quasha, and lovely to see them together. Cherkovski to explore…as I don’t know his new work. As with the rest of issue 44, lots, lots more to explore!  Thank you, Ed Foster.

Crownstones mark the actual Mason Dixon Line and Basil King’s poem is an exploration of the South, exemplified by Johnny Cash, Loretta Lynn, Eudora Welty, Elvis Presley, Mohammed Ali, and many of Martha King’s ancestors–William Davis, Gabriella Garth, Theodore Shuey, Agnes Symmers….

A brief excerpt:

I’ve never been to hell but I’ve seen
A wooden match
Glow in the eyes of those that hate
I saw that they wanted to burn
The house the sitting room the bed room
Burn black man burn white trash
Burn the tender the keeper’s voice
Burn the positive and the negative
Burn the arms the throat the song
The Weather Vane
The south the north the Continental Divide
The blond the red head the brunette
The black nappy African American hair
Define the root of its hollow springs
The spirit asks why

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Our UK Tour – Final installment

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October 17:  Sussex University;  October 24: Brookes Oxford

First of all, Brookes Oxford is a new university in Oxford, not the ancient dreaming spires establishment.  It was named in 1992 to honor its first principal … but was previously known as Oxford Polytechnic and before that as the Oxford School of Art.  A hundred years old and today quite new. Today’s university is exploding with students from less than privileged England and from all over the post-colonial world. They are taking high-tec courses in architecture, engineering, research, computer sciences, web design and, as ever, art.

But a multimedia sculptor on the faculty told me he hears students say they’ve chosen to study art because they didn’t know what else to do.  Almost a diagnostic of  contemporary discontent.  (What are we doing? Why?)

Sussex is older and younger than Brookes.  It was the first of a wave of British universities that opened in the 1960s, full of enthusiasm for exploring new relationships among teachers, learners, and the materials they might choose to draw from.  Fifty years on, it still attracts left-leaning politically progressive students, many of them readers and writers of poetry, but it is very very far from operating with a disseminated power structure, and for being a face of changed possibilities.

We presented Black Mountain Trace:  Martha King and Basil King at these two campuses in addition to our events at Kent University and Veg Box/Free Range. (See earlier post.)

We both read from our work, we screened Basil King:MIRAGE, Baz spoke about Olson’s classes and read his introduction to Charles Olson at Goddard College (from Cuineform Press, documenting a three-day Olson class in Olson’s own words).  And we screened the 10-minute version of  George Quasha’s tape, Basil King: A speaking portraitAt Sussex we had two hours in a dauntingly enormous amphitheater.  But it filled with 75 or 80 students, many of them already familiar with Black Mountain writers.

A titter ran across the audience when I broke from my reading to recommend John Wieners’ work.  Later, I was told the school has a corps of Wieners admirers, some of whom know all the Hotel Wentley poems by heart.

We had two hours – and then the event repaired to an on-campus pub.  We were mobbed.   Finally Daniel Kane, head of American studies and our host, pulled us away, stuffed us into a cab, and took us for a wonderful but much quieter dinner at a pub in Brighton.

At Brookes Oxford we had three hours, and could present all of that, with longer readings by us both, and a 30-minute excerpt from Cathryn Davis’s film Fully Awake: Black Mountain College which we’d shown at Kent.  (For more about this film, visit http://fullyawake.org/    Not only are we among the interviewees, but the focus of the film is the school as school, what it was like to be a student there in the several Black Mountains that made up its short history, and what was carried away by students as memory and personal process. )

When the Brookes bell rang signaling 4pm, the end of our session, only some of the audience got up to go, apologizing several of them. They nailed us for telling them that Black Mountain had no set end times for classes. At BMC if something was happening, everyone stayed, stayed until the subject  -or the people-  were depleted. Or until a natural end.  We couldn’t quite do that at Brookes…in part because our energy ends before subjects do, and in part because the room we occupied was assigned to something else at 5pm.  Our host whisked us away for hot coffee and Panini, which we badly needed.

The bigger question from all this is why U.K. students in three different institutions (and others elsewhere?) are looking with such interest at poetry written 60-some years ago – and expressing instant enthusiasm for Basil’s current work which was totally new to almost all of  them –  as well as responding to our BMC recollections.

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Our UK Tour – Questions asked in Canterbury

 Questions asked October 10 and 11

David Herd, at Kent University
David Herd, at Kent University
Ian Brinton and Laurie Duggan at Kent
Ian Brinton and Laurie Duggan at Kent

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why did you start writing so late?    (In 1985 Baz was 50 years old.)

I had one abortive attempt after another from the time I was a student.  I had one idea about making money by writing “The Black Mountain Bean Book,” with bean recipes and tales of Black Mountain, where I first leaned to cook.  Nothing.  Nothing.  I didn’t really start until after my first visit to U.K. – my first visit since leaving at age 11.  It was a shock.

When I got back to the U.S. I had a temporary job teaching painting and drawing. I was filling in for a friend at Rutgers Newark.  There was a huge gap between her morning and late afternoon classes. I sat in my friend’s office, began using her yellow legal pads, and I couldn’t stop.

The poem mirage and the movie MIRAGE begin that way: “It was 1985 and I was writing a poem.”

What was it like being a woman at Black Mountain College?

Difficult.  Attitudes about women were very much of the times, that is Olson’s were. I was unfortunately quite inured to the idea that women were some kind of “other” and not ever to be full members of the boys club. 1956!

Your painting is sometimes abstract and sometimes figurative. Why?

I can’ t separate one from the other.

If you were going to study art today where would you go?

I don’t know what I’d do now.  If I were a teenager today I might want to do something completely different. As it was I’d begun painting when I was 14.

  • Note: At the Veg Box, we screened Basil King:MIRAGE – the film by Nicole Peyrafitte and Miles Joris-Peyrafitte.  At Kent University, the next day,  we screened the art is not natural video of Basil by George Quasha (see YouTube), and a 30-minute excerpt of Cathryn Davis’s film Fully Awake: Black Mountain College. Most of the interviewees in this film are people who had been students there. This is an ongoing project aimed at showing how the school actually functioned.   See  http://fullyawake.org/
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September 22: Basil King at Anthology Film Archives

The Friends of Basil King will present “Basil’s Arc – The Paintings and Poetics of Basil King” at Anthology Film Archives,  32 Second Avenue at Second Street, New York City, on Saturday, September 22, 2012, from 12 noon to 6 pm.

Sponsored by Lunar Chandelier Press — this free event includes conversations about King’s visual art illustrated by slides, with critics and poets including Edna Augusta, William Benton, Laurie Duggan, Tom Fink, Mitch Highfill, Vincent Katz, Burt Kimmelman, Harry Lewis, Kimberly Lyons, Tom Patterson, George Quasha, Corinne Robbins, Barry Schwabsky, Lilly Wei, and others….

Along with these discussions there will be performances of original music inspired by King images (“The Green Man”  by Daniel Staniforth) and King text (“I Have a Little Song” from Mirage, by Nicole Peyrafitte).

"Two Kings--Green" - from the King of Diamonds series, mm/canvas, 44" x 60", 2011, ©Basil King.

Brief selections from King’s texts will be read by invited poets.

The highlight of the event will be the debut screening of a 22-minute film portrait, Basil King: MIRAGE, commissioned by The Friends of Basil King, and created by Nicole Peyrafitte and Miles Joris-Peyrafitte.

Save the date! You are invited!